Glitter girls enjoy final glory at state

By Kiara Zavala

“Competing in state is way different then competing in studio competitions. The atmosphere was really exciting, and it just smelled like hairspray.”-Lydia Breckenridge, junior

Breaking out their last dance moves of the year, the BSHS Glitter Girls competed at state in St. Louis on February 28th. There, the Glitter Girls performed in front of an audience bigger than the usual Friday night basketball game. “Performing in front of such a big audience made us more excited and determined than nervous,” said sophomore Alleson Cain. “Knowing we have so many people watching us gave us even more of a reason to go out there and show them what we can do.” Continue reading Glitter girls enjoy final glory at state

Style and support evident at school fashion show

By Hanna McMickell

This Saturday, Blue Springs High School will be hosting an event that is the first in the school’s history: a fashion show.

BSHS Fashion Club has prepared for this event by asking for student models and volunteers to help with the event the past few weeks. Leading up to the event, everyone is in a frenzy. Last minute alterations are being made to the clothing and rehearsals have been going on all week. Continue reading Style and support evident at school fashion show

Student directors bring on-stage experience to one acts

By Savannah Walsh

“As an actor you just have to memorize the script; as a director you have so much more responsibility.”-Claire Bradshaw, junior, on the role of a director

When a show is a hit, the actors are celebrated. When the show is a flop, the actors take the heat. However, no matter what degree of success a play or musical reaches, it is often the director who has the most creative control and yet earns the least amount of credit. This spring, the spotlight will shift to seniors Eli Reynolds and Colby Wakefield and juniors Madi Kisner and Claire Bradshaw, who are directing one acts for the BSHS drama department. Continue reading Student directors bring on-stage experience to one acts

A taste of success: cooking club receives 3rd at competition

By Ari Koch

“It’s super fun and you get to cook all kinds of different foods. It is a lot of hard work, but the work really pays off in the end.”-Mallory Noland, junior, on the cooking competition experience

Imagine creating a five-star cuisine in 60 minutes. The thought alone is enough to make any person sweat. Now imagine creating an appetizer, an entrée, and a dessert in 60 minutes, with the only source of heat being two gas burners. This daunting task did not at all deter the four students on the BSHS ProStart culinary team, and sponsor Brook Enright is proud of their work ethic and skill set. Continue reading A taste of success: cooking club receives 3rd at competition

Sex education is a two-fold responsibility

By Kayla Lessenden

Sex: not your typical dinner time conversation piece. In fact, talking about sex makes the majority of people uncomfortable; however, since the Center for Disease Control reports that 47 percent of high school students are having sex, we may want to up the number of discussions that involve this topic. The responsibility for hosting these conversations lies in two places: teens should be taught accurate facts in school about sex issues surrounding this subject matter, along with that parents should be a source to use for teens to get advice on situations and values about sex. Continue reading Sex education is a two-fold responsibility

Age and adulthood: the common misconception

By Annie Crawford

It’s finally here: the long-awaited 18th birthday. It is the day that you become an adult, the master of your own decisions; your parents can no longer stand in your way, the world is free for the taking. You get into your car and speed to the gas station to buy a lottery ticket just to say you did, even though you know you will never win. In time, though, you and everybody else who turns 18 discover that the turning point is a lot like the lottery ticket you just bought: almost completely worthless. Continue reading Age and adulthood: the common misconception

Brian Williams’ lie sheds light on universal truth

By Savannah Walsh

NBC news anchor Brian Williams is the 23rd most trusted person in the U.S. That is, former NBC news anchor Brian Williams was 23rd but his level of trustworthiness dropped in the last month–a lot. Fifty slots? A hundred? Try 812–announcing Williams as the 835th most trusted American. This notorious fall from grace occurred as the result of a fictitious story labeled as truth by Williams himself.  The line between truth and fiction is the intent of the falsehood. Many feel that Williams muddled that line by jeopardizing his journalistic integrity. But during the six month suspension Williams earned from NBC due to the controversy, I ask that we reflect on the intentions behind our own storytelling and the Brian Williams that lives in us all. Continue reading Brian Williams’ lie sheds light on universal truth

Feminism: the solution to gender inequality

By Ashley Wright

According to a poll conducted by the Huffington Post, 82 percent of Americans believe that men and women should have the same rights, but only one-fifth of those people considered themselves feminists. The dictionary definition of feminism is the belief that men and women should be equal in all aspects of life; therefore, if you believe that, then you’re a feminist. Continue reading Feminism: the solution to gender inequality

Old school vs new school: Why print books are still better

By Elliott Andrick

In today’s rapid advancement of technology, people are always looking for something to replace even if it’s not needing replacement. Technology is everywhere in a student’s lives, and in this case, enough is enough. Because digital copies of textbooks and regular books are not always the most dependable, people should to stick to using print books. Continue reading Old school vs new school: Why print books are still better

Bullying takes toll on victims, bystanders

By Kiara Zavala

One of the major issues among teenagers today is bullying. The only way to put a stop to it is to, as Mahatma Gandhi said, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” We can save lives by just standing up to the bully or reporting the bully. Don’t sit back and watch it happen. NoBullying.com, a website aimed at protecting youth worldwide from bullying, reports that 25 percent of today’s teenagers  have been bullied over social media. Three million kids per month are absent from school due to bullying. Continue reading Bullying takes toll on victims, bystanders

The online news home of Blue Springs High School. Article contributors include BSHS journalism students. Letters to the editor are welcome. Contact kgrusing@bssd.net with questions.